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as using effectiveness rate as your only measure. as we continue to put in place of the technology according to the plant has minute to congress, we will live creature continents that we will have situational awareness. thatl share with you bet is an inherent problem, knowing the actual denominator. >> i thought it bizarre that we measure our success by the people we ketch but not focusing on the people who got away. is an inherent problem. >> it is a number that is used as one of the many that taken gives you an overall picture. >> the department would have to gain effective control over high risk sectors along the border. tucson, theat the rio grande sector and the laredo sector. two in texas and one in arizona. is if they know where they're going to concentrate their efforts, they're going to redirect their efforts into areas that are not as secure. >> this is the way it will work. all sectors will have protectors when in them. you want to fit your resources where the traffic is greatest. if it shifts, the resources will ship. able better to predict where we think that will move
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
different. >> just in stem. science, technology. >> you can easily imagine where people are just issuing an ma exclusively's approval can get a visa. do not think that would make sense. >> i think we have gone over time. i have one mins left. have one more round. >> we have not had around and she has to be gone. we said we would finish at 5:00. i will give you one more question. how is that? andand you can submit -- any member can submit questions in writing which have to be answered one week later. questions have to be submitted by 5:00 wednesday. go ahead. what specific border security measures does this bill require in the non--high risk sectors. i have struggled to review the bill in that level of detail. sectors, what i understand is, why do they have n effectiveness rate? focusing him on appre -- only focusing on apprehensions? i added that in. i do not understand why we do not have it as a brought up race. broadrought up race -- base. only happenan between sectors on an annual basis. smugglers move every few weeks. >> thank you very much. and we not just add new responsibilities,
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
an aesthetic in the technology area. in the technology area. i do not see the difference between immigration legislation that brings in highly skilled citizens to pay for my retirement when i retire -- to keep this country running, we need to look at a terrorism bill -- terrorism and immigration are different. congress is working now. what's keep them working in passing bills and not stop due to some isolated event. says --tweet from erin we will go to brooklyn, new york, democratic carl -- caller. caller: good morning. just to say that i think immigration should go forward, but there should be e-verfies. -- il tell you the truth could not get through on the republican line -- i have to be conservative -- i notice when i call, i could never get through on the republican line. that is why i called on the democrat line. i'm tired of people saying that republicans are stopping obama's agenda. am an hispanic woman. in my neighborhood, it is mixed. a lot of people being taken advantage of that are mexican and spanish and low wages. that is not fair. i think immigration should go through. i wish t
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
libertarians have a problem with pretty much everything. >> we can do a lot more with advanced technologies without giving up our freedom. i don't think americans feel that they have to give up freedom in order to have security. >> does it change after an attack our consciousness about the threat, do you think? >> i think it would depend on what the source of this threat proves to be. if it looks like it's a foreign attack it could have one impact, if it looks like a more domestic origin then it will have perhaps a different effect. it kind of depend on the facts. >> reporter: it was interesting, bill, both those lawmakers, opening man rogers, senator levin talking about technology being the solution for security down the road. and i mentioned the concern of civil libertarians there are other lawmakers we talked to who expressed those concerns and are we'll be talking about those later on special report. bill: looking forward to that. peter king talked about 30 minutes ago about more photographic evidence -- more photographic ability in towns across the country. you wonder how that balances
with training our own workers and having more and more kids into science, engineering, technology, and math. we cannot just do one thing without the other. one of the details of our bill that is included in the gang of eight proposal is providing work authorization to the spouses of high skilled workers. i also see this as a women's issue. and an economic issue, because many of the spouses can make great contributions to our economy. can you comment on this? >> if you look at the past several decades, one of the overriding impacts in the u.s. is in the entry of women to the labor force. that's been one of the sources of increased growth in the u.s., probably the most important the flows of immigration by adding that second kick of both genders participate. that will allow us to continue something we have seen for the past decades. >> we have worked very hard to increase visa times for tourism visas. we've done good work with the state department in advertising our country. in the gang of eight proposal is something i worked on with senator schumer and others that would modernize the visa work p
" in a few. zap technology. departure. hertz gold plus rewards also offers ereturn-- our fastest way to return your car. just note your mileage and zap ! you're outta there ! we'll e-mail your receipt in a flash, too. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. for her whites. that part's true. are you still sleeping? just wanted to check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers. 14 clubs. that's what they tell us a legal golf bag can hold. and while that leaves a little room for balls and tees, it doesn't leave room for much else. there's no room left for deadlines or conference calls. not a single pocket to hold the stress of the day, or the to-do list of tomorrow. only 14 clubs pick up the right one and drive it right down the middle of pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. >>> welcome back to our continuing live coverage from boston, the aftermath of the boston marathon attacks. we are standing really just a block away from wh
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
technological. but she's right, this was a very professional operation up until it happened. obviously their escape plan was wanting. the idea they were able to put these bombs together, create the havoc and mayhem and commit the horrible terrorist acts they're alleged to have committed suggests it's not some training, then at least a lot of practice. >> there's one other thing i want to bring up with fran now. assume they were radicalized by watching videos online. does it seem unbelievable that they then would not try to reach out to other people who at least agree with them? >> that's part of the real focus. remember, there was the national security that the investigators used to question him. the information that jake's talking about, that's where that was gleaned. the focus was to ask him those very questions. were there additional explosives? were there additional individuals? that's the focus of the fbi. they want to know are there other individuals out there? this was very sophisticated. let's remember, the first bomb that exploded was the furthest away. and the runners running
a multimedia horror show. starring terrorism and technology. who could have imagined a major american city locked down? this, in an ordinary suburb like watertown, massachusetts. but who could have imagined that the tsarnaev brothers would be picked out of so many thousands, the tsarnaev brothers would be picked out of so many thousands, tens of thousands of pictures and identified so fast. name supplied to faces by state department computers. is this set of events a game-changer? >> it's the latest game-changer reporter: bill bratton has >> it's the latest game-changer reporter: bill bratton has been boston's police commissioner, new york's, and chief of police in los angeles. >> the game-changer here is that the big data error, the social media error, all aspects of that new world that was nonexistent even on 9/11. all of that came into play during this event. >> reporter: what time did you hear about the boston marathon bombing on monday? >> something just blew up. reporter: when did you start seeing the images of the explosions that were played back over and over? the man in the orange
by the rules supporting our farmers, and innovating for our technology companies, or creating businesses of their own. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants, as it did when my parents came here. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family, rd work, and fairness. in vermont, immigration has promoted cultural riches, refugee resettlement, student exchange. economic development to the five regional senate programs, tourism, and trade with our friends, in that wonderful country of canada. foreign agricultural workers support vermont farmers and growers, many of whom become part of families, woven into the fabric of vermont's ag consult -- agricultural community as they have in so many other states. the dysfunction of the system affects all of us. now is our time to fix it. this is our opportunity to do it. act deliberately, but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually, we have to vote. millions of people. millions of americans are depending upon us. senator grassley. >> yes. on this side, mr. chairman, we understand why the secretary can't be here and we feel she
technology reporter for cq roll call with the update on the internet bill. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> further debate on the internet sales tax bill happening this afternoon when the senate returns from recess at 2:15 eastern. live coverage here on c-span 2. we have a facebook question on the internet sales tax. internet sales tax support or oppose and why? dozens are weighing in. sheri says i support taxing internet sales although i hate paying tax on anything. if we must be taxed on whatever we buy regularly why wouldn't the same hold true with internet sales. jerry writes, he opposes it. a big indication it's a bad idea both amazon and wal-mart support it. why would you think that would be? taxes and regulations favor big retailers because they can cover the higher overhead where smaller businesses typically can not. and rich says, a state should not be allowed to tax people they do not represent. sound familiar? you can offer your comments at facebook.com/cspan. we might use some of your remarks on the air. live now, to the inside of the white house briefing r
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14